18 Feb 2018

Some web browsing..................


The Death of a ‘Beggar Saint’ is Announced

Pro-life means supporting women – Bishop Kelly 

Mothers and babies should be focus of referendum – Limerick bishop

Nuncio urges [Irish] Catholics not to be afraid to proclaim their Faith

Something to think about during Lent - join the community of Glenstal during their celebration of the hours of the Divine Office during the day online at their church web cam.

Archbishop of Canterbury reexamines the state of the nation in new book - “I think we’re at one of those moments which happens probably every three or four generations, when we have the opportunity and the necessity to reimagine what our society should look like in this country.”

Is Lent Really 40 Days? The Answer May Surprise You  

Lent, the bible and the housing crisis - 

Saint Claude de la Colombière and Sacred Heart devotion in Ireland 

The Benedict experiment

Vatican calls pre-synod meeting with young people in March
Youth look forward to sharing hopes, concerns in pre-synod meeting

Vatican denies reports that Benedict XVI has neurological disease

Paul VI will be canonized this year, Francis confirms

Site of Jesus' baptism to be cleared of mines after half a century

Theology of the people critical to understanding Francis
‘This Undermines the Sacred Character of Jerusalem’: Christian Leaders Protest Plan to Tax Church Properties



Egypt’s Copts flock to see church opened in remembrance of beheaded Christians

How Newman inspired the German resistance 

Pope Francis: sinners can become saints, but the corrupt cannot 

Pope Francis warns against 'fake fasting' during Lent 

In London Stands a Statue of the Long-Forgotten Lenten King 

Nun becomes 70th miraculous cure at Lourdes

70th cure reaffirms Lourdes’ importance – Irish doctor 

Pope’s call for ‘good readers’ refocuses attention on lectors 

17 Feb 2018

18th September 2018 - Letting Lent be God's time

On this weeks programme we continue our reflections on the "joyous" season of Lent and the opportunities it presents to us to reconnect with ourselves, with the world around us and with God. We have our regular reflection on the Sunday gospel as well as our liturgical odds & ends.

You can listen to this weeks full programme HERE.

A Lenten Reflection - "Letting Lent be God's time"


Continuing our series of reflections on Lent, this week SS102fm Shane leads us in a reflection on how Lent presents us with the opportunity to rediscover or even to find the passion in our relationship with God with the encouragement that we throw open our hearts to God. But with the reminder that we should also let Lent be a time for God to work on us - not as another opportunity to set New Years resolutions but letting Lent be God's time.

You can listen to the reflection excerpted from this weeks programme HERE.




Gospel - Mark 1:12-15


And the Spirit immediately drove him out into the wilderness. He was in the wilderness forty days, tempted by Satan; and he was with the wild beasts; and the angels waited on him. 
Now after John was arrested, Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God, and saying, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent, and believe in the good news.”
Reflections on this weeks Sunday gospel:

Word on Fire
Sunday Reflections
English Dominicans

Centre for Liturgy

Liturgical odds & ends

Liturgy of the Hours - Psalter week 1 - First Week of Lent

Saints of the Week

February 19th - Bl John Sullivan SJ
February 20th - St Jacinta Marto
February 21st - St Peter Damian
February 22nd - The Chair of St Peter
February 23rd - St Polycarp
February 24th - Bl Josefa Naval Girbes

14 Feb 2018

Save the Date! - Muintearas Iosa celebrates 40 years


A date for the diary of all those who have been part of the Muinteareas Íosa experience in our diocese and beyond! Its the 40th anniversary of this very special movement this year! And we intend to celebrate in Muinteareas style in April!! 

Please share the news of this celebration with everyone who might be interested. Those who can join us in April in Mary Immaculate College will be very welcome, those who can send pictures and memories will be much appreciated, and all who were with us at any point on the road will be included in our celebrations, conversations and prayer.

More details to follow - but lets get the date out far and wide this month so everyone knows they are welcome. 

Buíochas le Dia

It Took Forty Days…

Salt + Light TV - Reflection for Ash Wednesday by Fr Thomas Rosica, CSB

Pope's three actions to practice during Lent: Pause, See and Return - Rome Reports


Vatican News - Pope Francis celebrated Ash Wednesday Mass in the Basilica of Santa Sabina in Rome. As per tradition the ceremony started at the Basilica of St. Anselm where the Pope led a penitential procession to the nearby St. Sabina, marking the beginning Lent, the time of preparation for Holy Week.


13 Feb 2018

Lent - "Yes, open, open wide the doors to Christ – and you will find true life. Amen."


"Are we not perhaps all afraid in some way? If we let Christ enter fully into our lives, if we open ourselves totally to him, are we not afraid that He might take something away from us? Are we not perhaps afraid to give up something significant, something unique, something that makes life so beautiful? Do we not then risk ending up diminished and deprived of our freedom? And once again the Pope said: No! If we let Christ into our lives, we lose nothing, nothing, absolutely nothing of what makes life free, beautiful and great. No! Only in this friendship are the doors of life opened wide. Only in this friendship is the great potential of human existence truly revealed. Only in this friendship do we experience beauty and liberation. And so, today, with great strength and great conviction, on the basis of long personal experience of life, I say to you, dear young people: Do not be afraid of Christ! He takes nothing away, and he gives you everything. When we give ourselves to him, we receive a hundredfold in return. Yes, open, open wide the doors to Christ – and you will find true life. Amen."
- Pope Benedict XVI 



WoF - How to get ready for Lent

Fast & Feast for Lent 

Pray as You Go & Sacred Space.ie - Lent 2018 Retreat - Into the Wilderness

Lent for Dummies 

S&L - 5 Ways to Improve Your Prayer Life

S&L - 40 days of Lent...1 day at a time

40 Practical ideas for living Lent as parents

Letting This Lent Be God’s

4 Lenten traditions from your Polish grandma

The surprising Marian hymn the Church gives us for Lent

Getting Ready for Lent 2018

Preparation for Lent

Getting to forgiven

Still Us as We Approach Lent

Enkindling the World Before Lent





11 Feb 2018

11th February 2018 - Preparing to celebrate the season of Lent

On this weeks programme John and Shane are joined by Fr Luke McNamara from Glenstal Abbey to reflect on preparing to celebrate the season of Lent as well as telling us about a series of reflections on the readings of the Easter Vigil being hosted at the abbey. We have our regular reflection on the Sunday gospel as well as a quick run through this weeks liturgical odds and ends.

You can listen to the podcast of this weeks programme HERE.

Preparing to celebrate the season of Lent

Fr Luke McNamara OSB joins us on this weeks programme to discuss with us about preparing to celebrate the "joyous season" of Lent reflecting on what the different elements of Lent mean of us and the opportunity they present to reconnect with God and ourselves in the season of metonia. Reflecting on the opportunity to rebuild our relationships with God, others and ourselves, Fr Luke takes us through the chances presented to us as we prepare for Easter. 

As part of that preparation, making time and finding the opportunity to participate in Lent can be difficult. Fr Luke also shares with us an opportunity being presented by Glenstal Abbey to take time during Lent to reflect on our journey of faith towards Calvary and beyond and reflecting on the relationship God has maintained with his Chosen People throughout history in a series over the Sundays of Lent reflecting on the readings of the Easter Vigil.

You can listen to Fr Luke's reflection excerpted from the main programme podcast HERE.


Gospel - Mark 1:40-45



A leper came to him begging him, and kneeling he said to him, ‘If you choose, you can make me clean.’ Moved with pity, Jesus stretched out his hand and touched him, and said to him, ‘I do choose. Be made clean!’ Immediately the leprosy left him, and he was made clean. After sternly warning him he sent him away at once, saying to him, ‘See that you say nothing to anyone; but go, show yourself to the priest, and offer for your cleansing what Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.’ But he went out and began to proclaim it freely, and to spread the word, so that Jesus could no longer go into a town openly, but stayed out in the country; and people came to him from every quarter.
Reflections on this weeks gospel:

Word on Fire
Centre for Liturgy
English Dominicans
Sunday Reflections

Liturgical odds & ends

Liturgy of the Hours 

Psalter week 2 - 6th week in Ordinary time (Sunday - Tuesday)
Psalter week 4 - Ash Wednesday - Saturday 

Saints of the Week

February 12th -  Saint Ethelwald of Lindisfarne
February 13th - Saint Maura of Ravenna also Blessed Jordan of Saxony
February 14th - Ash Wednesday - Day of Fast & Abstinence 

The celebration of the season of Lent takes precedence takes most feasts and solemnities. The Sundays of Lent outrank all such feasts (with the feast of the Annunciation on March 25th being moved to April 9th). The weekdays of Lent also take precedence over the memorials of the saints during the week. 

February 15th - Saint Farannan of Iona
February 16th - The Shipwrecking of St Paul the Apostle
February 17th - Saint Fintán of Clonenagh

7 Feb 2018

Benedict XVI: ‘I am on a pilgrimage Home’


Pope emeritus Benedict XVI spoke about the “slow waning” of his physical strength and his “pilgrimage towards Home” in a letter sent to an Italian newspaper on Tuesday.

“It’s a great grace, in this last, at times tiring, stage of my journey, to be surrounded by a love and goodness that I could have never imagined,” Benedict wrote.

Continue reading:

6 Feb 2018

Pope's 2018 Lenten Message - “Because of the increase of iniquity, the love of many will grow cold”


2018 Lenten Message of His Holiness Pope Francis
“Because of the increase of iniquity, the love of many will grow cold” (Mt 24:12)

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Once again, the Pasch of the Lord draws near!  In our preparation for Easter, God in his providence offers us each year the season of Lent as a “sacramental sign of our conversion”. Lent summons us, and enables us, to come back to the Lord wholeheartedly and in every aspect of our life.

With this message, I would like again this year to help the entire Church experience this time of grace anew, with joy and in truth.  I will take my cue from the words of Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew: “Because of the increase of iniquity, the love of many will grow cold” (24:12).

These words appear in Christ’s preaching about the end of time.  They were spoken in Jerusalem, on the Mount of Olives, where the Lord’s passion would begin.  In reply to a question of the disciples, Jesus foretells a great tribulation and describes a situation in which the community of believers might well find itself: amid great trials, false prophets would lead people astray and the love that is the core of the Gospel would grow cold in the hearts of many.

False prophets

Let us listen to the Gospel passage and try to understand the guise such false prophets can assume.

They can appear as “snake charmers”, who manipulate human emotions in order to enslave others and lead them where they would have them go.  How many of God’s children are mesmerized by momentary pleasures, mistaking them for true happiness!  How many men and women live entranced by the dream of wealth, which only makes them slaves to profit and petty interests!  How many go through life believing that they are sufficient unto themselves, and end up entrapped by loneliness!

False prophets can also be “charlatans”, who offer easy and immediate solutions to suffering that soon prove utterly useless.  How many young people are taken in by the panacea of drugs, of disposable relationships, of easy but dishonest gains!  How many more are ensnared in a thoroughly “virtual” existence, in which relationships appear quick and straightforward, only to prove meaningless!  These swindlers, in peddling things that have no real value, rob people of all that is most precious: dignity, freedom and the ability to love.  They appeal to our vanity, our trust in appearances, but in the end they only make fools of us.  Nor should we be surprised.  In order to confound the human heart, the devil, who is “a liar and the father of lies” (Jn 8:44), has always presented evil as good, falsehood as truth.  That is why each of us is called to peer into our heart to see if we are falling prey to the lies of these false prophets.  We must learn to look closely, beneath the surface, and to recognize what leaves a good and lasting mark on our hearts, because it comes from God and is truly for our benefit.

A cold heart

In his description of hell, Dante Alighieri pictures the devil seated on a throne of ice, in frozen and loveless isolation.  We might well ask ourselves how it happens that charity can turn cold within us.  What are the signs that indicate that our love is beginning to cool?

More than anything else, what destroys charity is greed for money, “the root of all evil” (1 Tim 6:10).  The rejection of God and his peace soon follows; we prefer our own desolation rather than the comfort found in his word and the sacraments. All this leads to violence against anyone we think is a threat to our own “certainties”: the unborn child, the elderly and infirm, the migrant, the alien among us, or our neighbour who does not live up to our expectations.

Creation itself becomes a silent witness to this cooling of charity.  The earth is poisoned by refuse, discarded out of carelessness or for self-interest.  The seas, themselves polluted, engulf the remains of countless shipwrecked victims of forced migration.  The heavens, which in God’s plan, were created to sing his praises, are rent by engines raining down implements of death.

Love can also grow cold in our own communities.  In the Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium, I sought to describe the most evident signs of this lack of love: selfishness and spiritual sloth, sterile pessimism, the temptation to self-absorption, constant warring among ourselves, and the worldly mentality that makes us concerned only for appearances, and thus lessens our missionary zeal.

What are we to do?

Perhaps we see, deep within ourselves and all about us, the signs I have just described.  But the Church, our Mother and Teacher, along with the often bitter medicine of the truth, offers us in the Lenten season the soothing remedy of prayer, almsgiving and fasting.

By devoting more time to prayer, we enable our hearts to root out our secret lies and forms of self-deception, and then to find the consolation God offers. He is our Father and he wants us to live life well.

Almsgiving sets us free from greed and helps us to regard our neighbour as a brother or sister.  What I possess is never mine alone.  How I would like almsgiving to become a genuine style of life for each of us!  How I would like us, as Christians, to follow the example of the Apostles and see in the sharing of our possessions a tangible witness of the communion that is ours in the Church!  For this reason, I echo Saint Paul’s exhortation to the Corinthians to take up a collection for the community of Jerusalem as something from which they themselves would benefit (cf. 2 Cor 8:10).  This is all the more fitting during the Lenten season, when many groups take up collections to assist Churches and peoples in need.  Yet I would also hope that, even in our daily encounters with those who beg for our assistance, we would see such requests as coming from God himself.  When we give alms, we share in God’s providential care for each of his children.  If through me God helps someone today, will he not tomorrow provide for my own needs?  For no one is more generous than God.

Fasting weakens our tendency to violence; it disarms us and becomes an important opportunity for growth.  On the one hand, it allows us to experience what the destitute and the starving have to endure.  On the other hand, it expresses our own spiritual hunger and thirst for life in God.  Fasting wakes us up.  It makes us more attentive to God and our neighbour.  It revives our desire to obey God, who alone is capable of satisfying our hunger.

I would also like my invitation to extend beyond the bounds of the Catholic Church, and to reach all of you, men and women of good will, who are open to hearing God’s voice.  Perhaps, like ourselves, you are disturbed by the spread of iniquity in the world, you are concerned about the chill that paralyzes hearts and actions, and you see a weakening in our sense of being members of the one human family.  Join us, then, in raising our plea to God, in fasting, and in offering whatever you can to our brothers and sisters in need!

The fire of Easter

Above all, I urge the members of the Church to take up the Lenten journey with enthusiasm, sustained by almsgiving, fasting and prayer.  If, at times, the flame of charity seems to die in our own hearts, know that this is never the case in the heart of God!  He constantly gives us a chance to begin loving anew.

One such moment of grace will be, again this year, the “24 Hours for the Lord” initiative, which invites the entire Church community to celebrate the sacrament of Reconciliation in the context of Eucharistic adoration. In 2018, inspired by the words of Psalm 130:4, “With you is forgiveness”, this will take place from Friday, 9 March to Saturday, 10 March.  In each diocese, at least one church will remain open for twenty-four consecutive hours, offering an opportunity for both Eucharistic adoration and sacramental confession.

During the Easter Vigil, we will celebrate once more the moving rite of the lighting of the Easter candle.  Drawn from the “new fire”, this light will slowly overcome the darkness and illuminate the liturgical assembly.  “May the light of Christ rising in glory dispel the darkness of our hearts and minds”, and enable all of us to relive the experience of the disciples on the way to Emmaus. By listening to God’s word and drawing nourishment from the table of the Eucharist, may our hearts be ever more ardent in faith, hope and love.

With affection and the promise of my prayers for all of you, I send you my blessing.  Please do not forget to pray for me.

This Lent, revive your enthusiasm for the faith, Pope says

CNA - In his message for the upcoming Lenten season, Pope Francis urged people to renew their enthusiasm for the faith, using this season of prayer, fasting and almsgiving as an opportunity to stoke the flame of charity in their heart.

“Above all, I urge the members of the Church to take up the Lenten journey with enthusiasm, sustained by almsgiving, fasting and prayer,” the Pope said in his message, published Feb. 6.

“If, at times, the flame of charity seems to die in our own hearts, know that this is never the case in the heart of God! He constantly gives us a chance to begin loving anew.”

At the Easter Vigil, we will light the Easter candle, he said, explaining how it symbolizes a “new fire,” and will “slowly overcome the darkness and illuminate the liturgical assembly.”

“May the light of Christ rising in glory dispel the darkness of our hearts and minds,” he continued. “By listening to God’s word and drawing nourishment from the table of the Eucharist, may our hearts be ever more ardent in faith, hope and love.”

Written on the Solemnity of All Saints, the Pope’s message for Lent is on the theme: “Because of the increase of iniquity, the love of many will grow cold (Matt. 24:12).”

In the message, he warned against both cold hearts and “false prophets,” which he said tempt us to be led and enslaved by our emotions, or by a desire for wealth. “How many of God’s children are mesmerized by momentary pleasures, mistaking them for true happiness!” he wrote.

This is the core of Pope Francis’ Lenten message: to draw attention to the fact that there are many experiences which “whittle away all of [our] enthusiasm and zeal” for the faith, Cardinal Peter Turkson told CNA Feb. 6.

Head of the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development, he said that living as a disciple of Jesus has a lot of challenges, and therefore Francis’ message highlights the need to re-kindle the fire of our faith.

“Love can become cold because there are very many things which prevent it from sustaining the warmth of enthusiasm that it had,” Turkson explained. Therefore, this message invites us, through prayer, fasting and almsgiving, to re-inspire our love of God and neighbor.

“And this is crucial because all the good works that we decide to do… are all animated by a sense of love,” he continued.

Seeing the problems in the world and within ourselves, the solution is to turn to the Church, Pope Francis said, because along with the truth, she “offers us in the Lenten season the soothing remedy of prayer, almsgiving and fasting.”

One of the biggest obstacles to charity, he continued, is the evil of greed of money, which is what almsgiving helps to counteract.

“How I would like almsgiving to become a genuine style of life for each of us!” the Pope said. “How I would like us, as Christians, to follow the example of the Apostles and see in the sharing of our possessions a tangible witness of the communion that is ours in the Church!”

Almsgiving is very fitting during Lent, he continued, but added that he hopes that “even in our daily encounters with those who beg for our assistance, we would see such requests as coming from God himself.”

Almsgiving, along with prayer and fasting, are intended as instruments to fight both sin within ourselves and its effect on the world. For from greed, follows “the rejection of God and his peace,” he said. We begin to prefer “our own desolation rather than the comfort found in his word and the sacraments.”

Greed also may lead us to violence, he noted, pointing to how we lash out, in particular, at those we think threaten the “certainties” of our lives, such as the unborn child, the elderly and infirm, the immigrant, or even just the neighbor “who does not live up to our expectations.”

Almsgiving is a way of setting us free from greed, acknowledging that “what I possess is never mine alone.”

In fasting, too, we are given the opportunity to grow, he said, both by experiencing the hunger that many people around the world experience daily, and by expressing our own “spiritual hunger and thirst for life in God.”

“Fasting wakes us up. It makes us more attentive to God and our neighbor. It revives our desire to obey God, who alone is capable of satisfying our hunger,” he said.

He explained that devoting more time to prayer also helps us to root out vice from our hearts and to find consolation in God, who is our Father and who “wants us to live life well.”

“Lent summons us, and enables us, to come back to the Lord wholeheartedly and in every aspect of our life,” the Pope said. “With this message, I would like again this year to help the entire Church experience this time of grace anew, with joy and in truth.”

He also said that the Church would again be celebrating the “24 Hours for the Lord” initiative, which is a day for the whole Church to focus on the celebration of the sacrament of reconciliation, within the context of Eucharistic adoration.

This year, it will take place March 9-10, he said, inspired by the words of Psalm 130:4, “With you is forgiveness.” In each diocese, at least one church will remain open for twenty-four consecutive hours, he said, offering opportunities for adoration and sacramental confession.

Led by Pope Francis, “24 Hours for the Lord” is a worldwide initiative which points to confession as a primary way to experience God's merciful embrace. It was launched in 2014 under the auspices of the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization.

5 Feb 2018

SacredSpace102fm is now on iTunes

So after a lot of thinking and talking about, SacredSpace102fm is now live on the iTunes Podcast Directory as of today.

We are listed under our recording brand - Come & See Inspirations - with the plan being that we will be posting podcasts which may be additional to what is broadcast of West Limerick102fm online as well.

So spread the good news! We are available to listen online at




Falling in Love (Repost)








Pedro Arrupe SJ died ‪on this day in 1991. He was the first Basque since St Ignatius to be superior General of the Jesuits. He trained as a doctor before entering the Society and became a member of the Japanese Province. When the atomic bomb was dropped in August 1945 he was novice master at the community on the edge of Hiroshima and he organised for the care of many of the victims in the city. He became Provincial in Japan, and was elected General of the Jesuits in 1965. He was a inspirational leader and was widely respected as a ‘re-founder’ of the Society of Jesus in the light of Vatican II. He became a vocal advocate of peace and justice being an integral part of the preaching of the Good News in the modern world. Just before he was incapacitated by a stroke in 1981, he established the Jesuit Refugee Service, now at work today in more than 50 countries worldwide.



Over at Ignatian Solidarity they have a page dedicated to Pedro Arrupe SJ with many links and resources.

Have a look at the UK Jesuit's calendar which features Pedro Arrupe SJ for the month of February including an audio reflection HERE.

You can read more about Arrupe HERE.




In the Hands of God 
More than ever I find myself in the hands of God.
This is what I have wanted all my life from my youth.
But now there is a difference;
the initiative is entirely with God.
It is indeed a profound spiritual experience
to know and feel myself so totally in God’s hands.
Pedro Arrupe composed the above prayer after he suffered a debilitating stroke, the effects of which he patiently endured for the final ten years of his life. 

It’s time for lay leadership in Limerick, says Bishop Leahy


The declining numbers of available clergy and religious lend a sense of urgency to this development.

Contingency plans are being prepared in the Limerick diocese for a time when there won’t be 1 priest available for each of its 60 parishes.

Already, Limerick’s parishes have been grouped together into nine pastoral areas, with these areas providing “an opportunity for parishes to work together in such a way that individual parishes are supported in their efforts to ensure that they will continue to exist as vibrant communities of faith into the future”.

A diocesan statement said that while the experience of the diocese “of such inter-parish co-operation in the diocese has been mission-centred rather than utilitarian or pragmatic”, there is an awareness “that the declining numbers of available clergy and religious lend a sense of urgency to this development”.

There are currently 65 priests in active ministry in the diocese, but 27 are due to retire within the next 10 years. The last time a new diocesan priest was ordained in Limerick was in 2014 and, looking at seminary enrolments, it will be “at least another four years” before the next priest for the diocese is ordained.

Yesterday, in an interview with The Limerick Leader newspaper, Bishop Brendan Leahy said the pastoral model for the future involves priests being shared between parishes, and lay people taking on a greater role in the running of parish activities and services.

Following a diocesan synod in 2016, the following key roles that could be filled by lay people were identified: pastoral leaders, lay catechists, membership of baptism teams and leading funeral prayers.

“We are faced with many challenges, but these can also be opportunities for new ways and new life,” he told the paper.

At present, Bishop Leahy is conducting a review of diocesan logistics with his Episcopal Vicar for Pastoral Planning Fr Éamonn Fitzgibbon and the pastoral implementation manager Rose O’Connor.

Over the coming months, meetings are to be held to consult with parishioners on how best new structures could work for them. One thing that is certain is that the needs of each parish vary significantly, depending on their location and the number of amenities that come within their ambit.

“For example, some parishes may have a number of primary schools and some have at least one secondary school; others have third level colleges or hospitals or nursing homes,” said the Bishop. “Some parishes have more than one church and indeed, some have three.”

Another issue for the review to examine is how the diocese can best provide a youth ministry. But one of the biggest headaches of all is finance. Previously, diocesan clerics’ income came chiefly from the weekly church plate collection; but as congregation numbers decline, so too does the level of weekly offerings.

“With the fall-off in Mass attendance, the income source is no longer sufficient,” said the Bishop. “Yet the number of services, from regular Mass to sacramental moments in life like weddings, funerals, christenings, has not declined.”

Nevertheless, Bishop Leahy told the newspaper that he remains ever hopeful: “God has a plan and we are co-operating with the unfolding of that plan every day.”

Limerick LeaderBishop of Limerick says parishes 'may share priests' as Diocese-wide review takes place

4 Feb 2018

Some web browsing......


Pastoral Message of Bishop Kevin Doran – ‘The Gift of Life – A Shared Responsibility’ 
Voting to protect the unborn will send a powerful signal to the world
Nothing brave in embracing media abortion consensus – Creighton
Speaking up before the blow falls
Fighting against a eugenic reality

Euthanasia stems from reducing life to “efficiency and productivity,” pope says

A Lesson in Silence: What One Priest Gained From Living at a Carthusian Monastery

Pope recognizes martyrdom of Trappists in Algeria, clearing path to beatification 

Who is Madeleine Delbrêl—the “French Dorothy Day” Pope Francis made venerable this weekend?

The Benedict experiment

What is it like to be a religious brother? 

On abetting a miracle – What my daughter should understand about altar serving

Don’t substitute the lessons at Mass for non-biblical texts, Pope Francis says 

Proposed new Australian law could label priests ‘agents of the Vatican’

When a family digs the grave, and lowers the body themselves… 

A Burial at Gethsemani

Hopeful for the future - Former UCD student president Katie Ascough talks to Susan Gately about winning the prestigious Westminster Award
Ousted UCD president urges pro-life students to ‘stay strong’

Coping With Insecurity, Uncertainty and Risk

Cardinal Cupich rejects 'Benedict option,' calls for engagement with the world

Pope Francis: Where Mary is, ‘the devil does not enter’

Overcoming the Divisions that separate us

Faggioli, Douthat discuss Francis' first five years - Catholic Church headed for a conflict resolution, argues writer; theologian says Christianity was never accomplished, complete
Debate IRL: Douthat/Faggioli debate moves from Twitter to Fordham campus

3 Feb 2018

4th February 2018 - A visit to Our Lady's House at Walsingham

On this weeks programme, John takes us on an exploration of the Anglican Marian Shrine at Walsingham in England sometimes known as England's Nazareth. We have our weekly look at our saints of the week and other liturgical odds and ends as well as a rather brief look at this weeks gospel.

You can listen to the podcast of this weeks full programme on our podcast page HERE; or alternatively you can download it from Dropbox here.

Anglican Shrine to Our Lady of Walsingham - England's Nazareth



On this weeks programme John has an interview with Canon Stephen Gallagher in which they explore the history of the Anglican Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham and its restoration as part of the liturgical patrimony of the Church of England in the 1930's and to the modern day.

The Shrine of Our Lady at Walsingham was established in 1061 when, according to the text of the Pynson Ballad (c 1485), Richeldis de Faverches prayed that she might undertake some special work in honour of Our Lady. In answer to her prayer, the Virgin Mary led her in spirit to Nazareth, showed her the house where the Annunciation occurred, and asked her to build a replica in Walsingham to serve as a perpetual memorial of the Annunciation.

This Holy House was built and a religious community took charge of the foundation. Although we have very little historical material from this period, we know that with papal approval the Augustinian Canons built a Priory (c 1150). Walsingham became one of the greatest Shrines in Medieval Christendom.

In 1538, the Reformation caused the Priory property to be handed over to the King’s Commissioners and the famous statue of Our Lady of Walsingham was taken to London and burnt. Nothing remains today of the original shrine, but its site is marked on the lawn in “The Abbey Grounds” in the village. After the destruction of the Shrine, Walsingham ceased to be a place of pilgrimage. 

Anglican Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham


Our Lady's House, Anglican Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham
After nearly four hundred years, the 20th century saw the restoration of pilgrimage to Walsingham as a regular feature of Christian life in these islands, and indeed beyond. In 1897, there was a Roman Catholic pilgrimage to the restored 14th century Slipper Chapel, now at the centre of the Roman Catholic National Shrine.

Fr Hope Patten, appointed as Vicar of Walsingham in 1921, ignited Anglican interest in the pre-Reformation pilgrimage. It was his idea to base a new statue of Our Lady of Walsingham on the image depicted on the seal of the medieval Priory. In 1922, this statue was set up in the Parish Church of St. Mary, and regular pilgrimage devotion followed. From the first night that the statue was placed there, people gathered around it to pray, asking Mary to join her powerful prayer with theirs. This work of intercession continues to this day.

Throughout the 1920's, the trickle of pilgrims became a flood of large numbers, for whom eventually a Pilgrim Hospice was opened (a hospice is technically the name of a place of hospitality for pilgrims) and in 1931, a new Holy House encased in a small pilgrimage church was dedicated, and the statue translated there with great solemnity. In 1938 that church was enlarged to form the Anglican Shrine, more or less as we know it today. Fr Patten combined the posts of Vicar and Priest Administrator of the Shrine until his death in 1958.

You can read more about the Anglican Shrine here.



You can listen to the interview about Walsingham HERE; or alternatively you can download it from Dropbox here.

Gospel - Mark 1:40-45


As soon as they left the synagogue, they entered the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John. Now Simon’s mother-in-law was in bed with a fever, and they told him about her at once. He came and took her by the hand and lifted her up. Then the fever left her, and she began to serve them.

 That evening, at sunset, they brought to him all who were sick or possessed with demons. And the whole city was gathered around the door. And he cured many who were sick with various diseases, and cast out many demons; and he would not permit the demons to speak, because they knew him.



In the morning, while it was still very dark, he got up and went out to a deserted place, and there he prayed. And Simon and his companions hunted for him. When they found him, they said to him, ‘Everyone is searching for you.’ He answered, ‘Let us go on to the neighbouring towns, so that I may proclaim the message there also; for that is what I came out to do.’ And he went throughout Galilee, proclaiming the message in their synagogues and casting out demons.

Reflections on this weeks gospel:

Word on Fire
English Dominicans
Centre for Liturgy
Sunday Reflections

Liturgical odds & ends

Liturgy of the Hours - Psalter week 1, 5th week in Ordinary Time

Saints of the Week

February 5th - St Agatha
February 6th - St Paul Miki & Companions
February 7th - St Mel
February 8th - St Josephine Bakhita - International Day of Prayer & Awareness against Human Trafficking
February 9th - Bl Marianus Scotus
February 10th - St Scholastica