14 Aug 2018

15th August 2018 - Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary


It is truly right and just, our duty and our salvation,
always and everywhere to give You thanks,
Lord, holy Father, almighty and eternal God,
through Christ our Lord.
For today the Virgin Mother of God
was assumed into heaven
as the beginning and image
of Your Church’s coming to perfection
and a sign of sure hope and comfort to Your pilgrim people;
rightly You would not allow her
to see the corruption of the tomb
since from her own body she marvellously brought forth
Your incarnate Son, the Author of all life. 
(The 1973 version of the Preface for the Mass of the Solemnity)

The 15th August in the Latin/western tradition is the celebration of the Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. While having different theological foci on the celebration, it is a common liturgical date of celebration for both Catholics and Orthodox Christians.

The dogma was officially declared by Pope Pius XII in 1950 in the apostolic constitution  Munificentissimus Deus. The apostolic constitution traces out the ancient understanding of the dogma going back through the centuries and emphasises that its official declaration by Pope Pius XII was seen as only the official confirmation of a belief long held in the Tradition of the church rather than as something new. Rather than something imposed by Pius XII, consultation was made with the bishops and on May 1, 1946, a letter "Deiparae Virginis Mariae," was issued which asked, "Do you, venerable brethren, in your outstanding wisdom and prudence, judge that the bodily Assumption of the Blessed Virgin can be proposed and defined as a dogma of faith? Do you, with your clergy and people, desire it?" with a response very much in the affirmative.


So, Pius XII declared that:


"Hence the revered Mother of God, from all eternity joined in a hidden way with Jesus Christ in one and the same decree of predestination,(47) immaculate in her conception, a most perfect virgin in her divine motherhood, the noble associate of the divine Redeemer who has won a complete triumph over sin and its consequences, finally obtained, as the supreme culmination of her privileges, that she should be preserved free from the corruption of the tomb and that, like her own Son, having overcome death, she might be taken up body and soul to the glory of heaven where, as Queen, she sits in splendour at the right hand of her Son, the immortal King of the Ages.......after we have poured forth prayers of supplication again and again to God, and have invoked the light of the Spirit of Truth, for the glory of Almighty God who has lavished his special affection upon the Virgin Mary, for the honour of her Son, the immortal King of the Ages and the Victor over sin and death, for the increase of the glory of that same august Mother, and for the joy and exultation of the entire Church; by the authority of our Lord Jesus Christ, of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and by our own authority, we pronounce, declare, and define it to be a divinely revealed dogma: that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever Virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory......
 The following reading on the Assumption (known by eastern Christians as the Dormition) of Mary is taken from the first homily of St. John Damascene on the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
“But even though, according to nature, your most holy and happy soul is separated from your most blessed and stainless body and the body as usual is delivered to the tomb, it will not remain in the power of death and is not subject to decay. For just as her virginity remained inviolate while giving birth, when she departed her body was preserved from destruction and only taken to a better and more divine tabernacle, which is not subject to any death . . . Hence I will call her holy passing not death, but falling asleep or departure, or better still, arrival. . . .

"Your stainless and wholly immaculate body has not been left on earth; the Queen, the Mistress, the Mother of God who has truly given birth to God has been translated to the royal palaces of heaven. .

 "Angels and archangels have borne you upwards, the impure spirits of the air have trembled at your ascension. The air is purified, the ether sanctified by your passing through them. . . the powers meet you with sacred hymns and much solemnity, saying something like this: Who is she that comes forth as the morning rising, fair as the moon, elect like the sun? [cf. Cant 6:9] How you have blossomed forth, how sweet you have become! You are the flower of the field, a lily among the thorns [Cant 2.1] . . . Not like Elijah have you entered heaven, not like Paul have you been rapt to the third heaven; no, you have penetrated even to the royal throne of your Son himself . . . a blessing for the world, a sanctification of the universe, refreshment for those who are tired, comfort for the sorrowing, healing for the sick, a port for those in danger, pardon for sinners, soothing balm for the oppressed, quick help for all who pray to you. . .

“Good Mistress, graciously look down on us; direct and guide our destinies wheresoever you will. Pacify the storm of our wicked passions, guide us into the quiet port of the divine will and grant us the blessedness to come.”



  • While no longer being updated, one blog which we often recommend for reflections is Blue Eyed Ennis; check out these posts here, here and here (the last one is an interesting reflection on Struggling with the Assumption).

15th August 2018 - The Dormition of the Birthgiver of God


In the Orthodox Churches, the feast of the Dormition or Falling-asleep of the Theotokos is celebrated on the fifteenth of August, preceded by a two-week fast. This feast commemorates the death, resurrection and glorification of Christ’s mother. It proclaims that Mary has been “assumed” by God into the heavenly kingdom of Christ in the fullness of her spiritual and bodily existence.

As with the nativity of the Virgin and the feast of her entrance to the temple, there are no biblical or historical sources for this feast. The Tradition of the Church is that Mary died as all people die, not “voluntarily” as her Son, but by the necessity of her mortal human nature which is indivisibly bound up with the corruption of this world.

The Orthodox Church teaches that Mary is without personal sins. In the Gospel of the feast, however, in the liturgical services and in the Dormition icon, the Church proclaims as well that Mary truly needed to be saved by Christ as all human persons are saved from the trials, sufferings and death of this world; and that having truly died, she was raised up by her Son as the Mother of Life and participates already in the eternal life of paradise which is prepared and promised to all who “hear the word of God and keep it” (Lk11.27–28).

In giving birth, you preserved your virginity. In falling asleep you did not forsake the world, O Theotokos. You were translated to life, O Mother of Life, and by your prayers, you deliver our souls from death (Troparion).

Neither the tomb, nor death, could hold the Theotokos, who is constant in prayer and our firm hope in her intercessions. For being the Mother of Life, she was translated to life, by the One who dwelt in her virginal womb (Kontakion).

The services of the feast repeat the main theme, that the Mother of Life has “passed over into the heavenly joy, into the divine gladness and unending delight” of the Kingdom of her Son (Vesperal hymn). The Old Testament readings, as well as the gospel readings for the Vigil and the Divine Liturgy, are exactly the same as those for the feast of the Virgin’s nativity and her entrance into the Temple. Thus, at the Vigil we again hear Mary say: “My soul magnifies the Lord and my Spirit rejoices in God my Saviour” (Lk 1.47). At the Divine Liturgy we hear the letter to the Philippians where Saint Paul speaks of the self-emptying of Christ who condescends to human servitude and ignoble death in order to be “highly exalted by God his Father” (Phil 2.5–11). And once again we hear in the Gospel that Mary’s blessedness belongs to all who “hear the word of God and keep it” (Lk 11.27–28).


Thus, the feast of the Dormition of the Theotokos is the celebration of the fact that all humans are “highly exalted” in the blessedness of the victorious Christ, and that this high exaltation has already been accomplished in Mary the Theotokos. The feast of the Dormition is the sign, the guarantee, and the celebration that Mary’s fate is, the destiny of all those of “low estate” whose souls magnify the Lord, whose spirits rejoice in God the Saviour, whose lives are totally dedicated to hearing and keeping the Word of God which is given to men in Mary’s child, the Saviour and Redeemer of the world.

Finally it must be stressed that, in all of the feasts of the Virgin Mother of God in the Church, the Orthodox Christians celebrate facts of their own lives in Christ and the Holy Spirit. What happens to Mary happens to all who imitate her holy life of humility, obedience, and love. With her all people will be “blessed” to be “more honorable than the cherubim and beyond compare more glorious than the seraphim” if they follow her example. All will have Christ born in them by the Holy Spirit. All will become temples of the living God. All will share in the eternal life of His Kingdom who live the life that Mary lived.

In this sense everything that is praised and glorified in Mary is a sign of what is offered to all persons in the life of the Church. It is for this reason that Mary, with the divine child Jesus within her, is called in the Orthodox Tradition the Image of the Church. For the assembly of the saved is those in whom Christ dwells.

- From the Orthodox Church in America


13 Aug 2018

"The Future of the Irish parish: Lessons from around the world" (28th & 29th August 2018) - IIPS -MIC St Patrick's Campus, Thurles




The Irish Institute for Pastoral Studies at Mary Immaculate College is a new part of MIC which is based on the campus of St Patrick's College in Thurles. It is intended that Thurles will serve as a centre for theological, pastoral and spiritual renewal in the entire region.


Fr Eamonn Fitzgibbon joined the SS102fm team on our weekly programme on 29th July 2018 to introduce the IIPS-MIC to WL102fm listeners and also to promote an upcoming exciting conference to be held at IIPS-MIC in August immediately after the WMoF2018 in Dublin.

The conference has as its theme "The Future of the Irish parish: Lessons from around the world" which brings together sharing's and experiences from all corners of the globe about the changing nature and meaning of parish life both within the church but also as an external manifestation of identity.

Parish life in Ireland both urban and rural has been under going massive change over the last number of years but is still a key part of Irish self identity and understanding. It is not for nothing that often the first question an Irish person asks another is not who are you, but rather where are you from?

With the forth coming decline in the number of priests in active ministry, the challenge has been for the Irish church to get to grips with how we understand and celebrate parishes as vibrant, living expressions of lived communities of faith with a model which is no longer so centred on the role and identity of the parish priest. 

The aim of the conference is to look to examples of this from around the world and to remind ourselves of the words of Pope Francis that "the parish is not an out-dated institution" (E.G.28, Pope Francis).



Speakers and topics at the conference are:
  • Lessons from New Zealand, Launch Out: Lay Pastoral Leadership Roles, (Cardinal John Dew, Archdiocese of Wellington, New Zealand)
  • Lessons from South Africa, The Parish as a Community of Communities (Bishop Michael Wüstenberg, Bishop Emeritus, Aliwal, South Africa)
  • Lessons from Liverpool,  The Experience of Widnes as a Witness to Team Ministry (Rev. Matthew Nunes Episcopal Vicar for Formation, Archdiocese of Liverpool)
  • Lessons from Canada,  Rites and Responsibilities: The Role of the Clergy and the Laity in the Catholic Church, (Dr Margaret Lavin, Professor Emeritus at Regis College, Toronto)
  • Applying the Learnings, Facilitated by Martin Kennedy and Dr Jessie Rogers.
You can visit the website of the Irish Institute for Pastoral Studies HERE.

Register for the conference 28th and 29th August HERE which also includes the full schedule and back ground information on each of the presenters and facilitators.

You can listen to Fr Eamonn Fitzgibbons interview excerpted from the main programme on 29th July 2018 podcast HERE.

12 Aug 2018

Some web browsing........


The Church and Clergy in Crisis: 7 practical first steps we must take

Set prisoners free to mark Pope’s arrival 

New pope emojis will mark Francis’s visit to Ireland

Papal plague cautions ‘overplayed’, expert says

Minister should not feel threatened by Catholic Church imparting its doctrines to the faithful of all ages 

Health Minister attacks Bishop for defending Humanae Vitae

Hanging Bishop Doran for what he didn’t say

Baroness O’Loan rejects Simon Harris’ conscientious objection definition 

Violent pro-choice protests in Argentina as Senate rejects abortion law

A fairer media and powerful pro-life women: how Argentina succeeded where Ireland failed 

Stop letting Michael D off lightly: here are the questions he should be made to answer 

Confusing the Self-Emptying Love of the Cross with Political Power 

Scandal in the Church: God made room for sinners as well as saints

Reflections on the abuse saga: It’s not just about McCarrick

Why the Left Is So Afraid of Jordan Peterson

Householders asked to invite elderly to watch Pope’s Mass - Irish Catholic

From The Irish Catholic:

Homeowners are being encouraged to invite elderly people who may have mobility or other issues to their houses to watch the papal Mass in a group setting. 
Pope Francis’ Mass in the Phoenix Park on August 26 is set to be an historic event for all involved, but with many elderly people unable to attend, an Irish charity is encouraging friends and family to come together to offer alternative options. 
Anne Dempsey of Third Age says the 5km walk from public transport points and the standing – despite the rest stops, food and drinks stations, medical and toilets facilities that are organised – would mean many wouldn’t chance attending. 
“Some people who are very staunch Catholics, weekly and even daily Massgoers, are not going because they say they wouldn’t be able for it,” she said. 
“I have heard that friends are gathering and meeting in houses. It will probably generate a lot of conversations about the Church. 
“This is also an opportunity for people to come together in an interesting and different kind of way. 
“I would say to people to invite their (elderly) relatives and neighbours. It could be nice for people to sit around in a group setting and perhaps reminisce about the last papal visit.”

I am the Bread of Life

12th August 2018 - Visit of the relics of Saints Louis & Zélie Martin and Saint Thérèse of Lisieux to Limerick

On this weeks programme (via some very dodgy Skype connections!) John and Shane are joined by Sr Beatrice Cotter from the Dominican Sisters of St Cecilia in Nashville (and also of St Saviours Parish Limerick!) to tell us about the up coming visit of the relics of Saints Louis & Zélie Martin and Saint Thérèse of Lisieux to Limerick and the example of the Martin's to us in our daily lives. We have our regular run through the saints of the week, local notices and of course a short reflection on the Sunday gospel.

You can listen to the podcast of the full programme HERE.


Visit of the relics of Saints Louis & Zélie Martin and Saint Thérèse of Lisieux to Limerick



Sr Beatrice Cotter joins us on this weeks programme with a reflection on the example of the Martin family as saints for us. While one member of the family may be more well known than all the others, the example of St Louis and Zeile Martin cannot but have influenced St Therese of Lisieux and her sisters - three of whom also entered Carmel and one became a Visitation sister.

The Dominican Church, Glentworth St, Limerick will be hosting the relics of Saint Therese of Lisieux, and of her parents, Saints Louis and Zelie Martin, on Saturday 18 August, beginning with the 1pm Mass. Blessing of roses, veneration of relics, and reflections by the Dominicans will follow, with sung Vespers concluding the event at 5pm.



You can listen to Sr Beatrice reflection on the example of the Martin's HERE.



Gospel - John 6:41-51

Then the Jews began to complain about him because he said, ‘I am the bread that came down from heaven.’ They were saying, ‘Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know? How can he now say, “I have come down from heaven”?’ Jesus answered them, ‘Do not complain among yourselves. No one can come to me unless drawn by the Father who sent me; and I will raise that person up on the last day. It is written in the prophets, “And they shall all be taught by God.” Everyone who has heard and learned from the Father comes to me. Not that anyone has seen the Father except the one who is from God; he has seen the Father. Very truly, I tell you, whoever believes has eternal life. I am the bread of life. Your ancestors ate the manna in the wilderness, and they died. This is the bread that comes down from heaven, so that one may eat of it and not die. I am the living bread that came down from heaven. Whoever eats of this bread will live for ever; and the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh.’
Reflections on this weeks gospel:

Word on Fire
English Dominicans
Centre for Liturgy
Sunday Reflections

Liturgical odds and ends

Liturgy of the Hours - Psalter week 3

Saints of the Week

13th August - Bl Con O'Rourke
14th August - St Maximilian Kolbe
15th August - Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
16th August - St Stephen of Hungary
17th August - Our Lady of Knock (as per the revised Irish liturgical calendar)
18th August - St Ronan of Iona

7 Aug 2018

The Relics of Saints Louis & Zélie Martin and Saint Thérèse of Lisieux are visiting Ireland - August 4 to Sept 9 2018


In conjunction with the organisers of the World Meeting of Families, the Irish Order of Carmelites, Order of Discalced Carmelites, Carmelite nuns and Lay/Secular Carmelites have arranged that Relics of Saints Louis, Zélie and Thérèse will come from Lisieux and be in Ireland for the World Meeting of Families. The relics will arrive on August 4 and remain in Ireland until September 9

The Relics of Saints Louis & Zélie Martin and Saint Thérèse of Lisieux visiting Whitefriar Street Church, Dublin
The Relics will be at the Opening Ceremony in the R.D.S., Dublin, on Tuesday, August 21, and they will also be in the sanctuary in the Phoenix Park for the Papal Mass on Sunday, August 26. The Carmelites have also been invited to give a forty-five minute presentation on the spirituality of the Martin family in the Phoenix Park before the Papal Mass. This will consist of interviews with people on aspects of the Martin spirituality, texts from the writings of the saints and intercessions and have engaged the services of Kairos Communications to ensure that this will be done to a professional standard. Music will be provided by the Comhaltas Ceoltóiri Eireann orchestra.

The Relics will also travel to several places across Ireland before and after the World Meeting and this gives a much wider group of people who cannot the Congress in the R.D.S. or the Festival of Families in Croke Park or the Papal Mass at the close of the World Meeting to participate in the Meeting in a different though tangible way. Given the short time the Relics will be in the country it is not possible to visit every diocese and every part of the island, but the hope is that given the time available, that as many people as possible will be able to spend time with the Relics and to consider the life of this saintly family. The journey of the Relics through Ireland is a form of pilgrimage leading up to the World Meeting itself and leading away from it afterwards.

Each place that will receive the Reliquaries will organise their own liturgical celebrations and times for veneration and these will be made known over the coming weeks. Information regarding the preparations in each place can be had direct from each place.

You can find more information from the Carmelites website here.

*******************


The Dominican Church, Glentworth St, Limerick will be hosting the relics of Saint Therese of Lisieux, and of her parents, Saints Louis and Zelie Martin, on Saturday 18 August, beginning with the 1pm Mass. Blessing of roses, veneration of relics, and reflections by the Dominicans will follow, with sung Vespers concluding the event at 5pm.


Some web browsing.........


Pope Francis changes Catechism to say death penalty ‘inadmissible’

Pope Francis Changes Catechism to Say Death Penalty ‘Inadmissible’ - In an explanatory letter to bishops, CDF prefect Cardinal Ladaria states the change is an ‘authentic development of doctrine,’ building on the teaching of Pope St. John Paul II and Benedict XVI
Wrestling With Capital Punishment - Pope Francis’ revision of Catholic teaching on the death penalty builds on teaching of recent popes, but also raises concerns from some analysts.
Prosecutor disagrees with Pope Francis’s death penalty ruling 
The pope is right: the death penalty has no place in Catholicism
Pope Francis Says No to Centuries of Church Teaching 
US bishops welcome change to Catechism on death penalty
Pope Francis revises Catechism, teaches that death penalty is ‘inadmissible’
The Pope's Groundbreaking Rejection of the Death Penalty
With death penalty change, Francis builds on John Paul II's teaching
The Absolute "No" To the Death Penalty. A Victory For the Gospe Or For "Secular Humanism"? 
What Pope Francis' death penalty reversal means for Trump and capital punishment globally
Death penalty opponents welcome Pope Francis' catechism revision
Pope Francis, the death penalty, and the development of doctrine

The war-torn region the Church wouldn’t leave


Varadkar: I’ll push Pope on accepting same-sex families 


Irish bishops reiterate that Catholic hospitals cannot perform abortions


Irish pro-life leader says ‘near-total media bias’ behind referendum defeat 


Pope prays Blessed Paul VI will intercede for ‘Church he loved so much’ 


Huge overseas interest in WMOF congress


With "Humanae Vitae" Paul VI Was Right. "L'Osservatore Romano" Lays Down the Law 

"Oremus" For Peace in the Middle East. But For Ukraine, Among the Orthodox the War Is On 


Health Minister attacks Bishop for defending Humanae Vitae 


This Beautiful Religious Order Is For Women With Down Syndrome


Finding rest in prayer 

Reflection on The Divine Office and the Changing of Volumes

4 Aug 2018

5th August 2018 - WMoF2018 in Newcastle West

This weeks programme brings the WMoF2018 closer to home with a discussion about the upcoming events in Newcastle West to mark the occasion on 11th August when Maria Culloty and Kathleen Sugrue join John and Lorraine in studio on this weeks programme. We have our regular reflection on this weeks Sunday gospel, a run through the celestial guides for the week as well as other bits and pieces.

You can listen to the podcast of this weeks full programme HERE.

WMoF2018 in Newcastle West


On this weeks programme Mariah Culloty and Kathleen Sugrue (members of Newcastle West Parish Liurgy Group) join John and Lorraine to share with us some of the local parish plans for marking World Meeting of Families 2018 in Newcastle West. On Saturday August 11th at the 6.30pm Vigil Mass there is a special theme of "Celebration of Families" where there will be music, specially prepared prayers and reflections, a vibrant and welcoming atmosphere and also a cup of tea or coffee afterwards. Newcastle West parish would like to extend a warm welcome to everyone to come along and join in on this celebration.

Mariah and Kathleen also chat about the importance of supporting and connecting with families as a church and why the theme of joy is essential both for the WMoF21018 and for sharing our faith.

You can listen to the interview excerpted from the main programme HERE.



Gospel - John 6:24-35


When the crowd saw that neither Jesus nor his disciples were there,
they themselves got into boats
and came to Capernaum looking for Jesus.
And when they found him across the sea they said to him,
"Rabbi, when did you get here?"
Jesus answered them and said,
"Amen, amen, I say to you,
you are looking for me not because you saw signs
but because you ate the loaves and were filled.
Do not work for food that perishes
but for the food that endures for eternal life,
which the Son of Man will give you.
For on him the Father, God, has set his seal."
So they said to him,
"What can we do to accomplish the works of God?"
Jesus answered and said to them,
"This is the work of God, that you believe in the one he sent."
So they said to him,
"What sign can you do, that we may see and believe in you?
What can you do?
Our ancestors ate manna in the desert, as it is written:
He gave them bread from heaven to eat."
So Jesus said to them,
"Amen, amen, I say to you,
it was not Moses who gave the bread from heaven;
my Father gives you the true bread from heaven.
For the bread of God is that which comes down from heaven
and gives life to the world."
So they said to him,
"Sir, give us this bread always."
Jesus said to them,
"I am the bread of life;
whoever comes to me will never hunger,
and whoever believes in me will never thirst."
Reflections on this weeks gospel:

Word on Fire
Sunday Reflections
English Dominicans
Centre for Liturgy

Liturgical odds & ends


Liturgy of the Hours - Psalter week 2


Saints of the Week


August 6th - Transfiguration of the Lord

August 7th - St Sixtus II & Companions
August 8th - St Dominic also St Mary MacKillop
(NLM - Liturgical Notes on the Feast of St Dominic)
August 9th - St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross (Edith Stein)
August 10th - St Lawrence
August 11th - St Clare

31 Jul 2018

AMORIS Animations (6/6) - How families transform the world


The AMORIS animations (produced by Ministory) reflect on the vision of love, marriage and family presented by Pope Francis in The Joy of Love. 

In Amoris Laetitia, Pope Francis shows how families as the domestic church can help transform the world . 

[You can find all six episodes on the Amoris website HERE.]

29 Jul 2018

WMOF ToTD


Some web browsing.............


Reek Sunday - “Church in Ireland is called to return to penance and prayer”

Reek Sunday - Archbishop shares his experience of the Reek Sunday pilgrimage

The State must respect the conscience rights of pro-life hospitals 

Three children killed under Belgium’s euthanasia law

Plea for return of unused Pope Francis Mass tickets 

Free bus, trains and trams in Dublin for papal mass pilgrims

Govt Minister calls for referendum to remove special status of marriage 

Labour senator launches petition to end state-funding of denominational schools 

Poor Clares on the move – along with their deceased Sisters

Rome Diocese opens beatification process of Jesuit superior general Fr. Arrupe

Archbishop says youth alienated by Catholic Church 

US-based Irish seminarian to feature on Nationwide 

The deepest of human longing: A crucible of reason strengthens faith - Notre Dame-Newman Centre project aims to honour legacy of inquiry

Social Media and Sabbath rest: What I have learned 

Simcha Fisher: We must remain open to the beauty around us

The Bodies Lying Right Beneath My Feet

Set aside ideology. The US bishops are guilty of a collective failure 

Time for McCarrick and the rest to answer to the laity and the priesthood

McCarrick, Mary, and Mystery: Seeking truth in the moment

AMORIS Animations (5/6) - Love and mercy


The AMORIS animations (produced by Ministory) reflect on the vision of love, marriage and family presented by Pope Francis in The Joy of Love. 

In Amoris Laetitia, Pope Francis writes that he wishes to encourage everyone to be a sign of mercy.

[You can find all six episodes on the Amoris website HERE.]

28 Jul 2018

29 July 2018 - The Irish Institute for Pastoral Studies MIC presents "The Future of the Irish parish: Lessons from around the world"

On this weeks programme Fr Eamonn Fitzgibbon, director of the Irish Institute for Pastoral Studies (IIPS) at Mary Immaculate College (MIC) joins John and Shane on the programme to discuss upcoming conference which will take as its theme "The Future of the Irish parish: Lessons from around the world""

We have our regular reflection on the Sunday gospel as well as a quick run through the liturgical odds and ends and some local notices.

You can listen to the full podcast of the programme HERE.


"The Future of the Irish parish: Lessons from around the world" (28th & 29th August 2018) - IIPS -MIC St Patrick's Campus, Thurles 



The Irish Institute for Pastoral Studies at Mary Immaculate College is a new part of MIC which is based on the campus of St Patrick's College in Thurles. It is intended that Thurles will serve as a centre for theological, pastoral and spiritual renewal in the entire region.


Fr Eamonn Fitzgibbon joined the SS102fm team on this weeks programme to introduce the IIPS-MIC to WL102fm listeners and also to promote an upcoming exciting conference to be held at IIPS-MIC in August immediately after the WMoF2018 in Dublin.

The conference has as its theme "The Future of the Irish parish: Lessons from around the world" which brings together sharing's and experiences from all corners of the globe about the changing nature and meaning of parish life both within the church but also as an external manifestation of identity.

Parish life in Ireland both urban and rural has been under going massive change over the last number of years but is still a key part of Irish self identity and understanding. It is not for nothing that often the first question an Irish person asks another is not who are you, but rather where are you from?

With the forth coming decline in the number of priests in active ministry, the challenge has been for the Irish church to get to grips with how we understand and celebrate parishes as vibrant, living expressions of lived communities of faith with a model which is no longer so centred on the role and identity of the parish priest. 

The aim of the conference is to look to examples of this from around the world and to remind ourselves of the words of Pope Francis that "the parish is not an out-dated institution" (E.G.28, Pope Francis).



Speakers and topics at the conference are:
  • Lessons from New Zealand, Launch Out: Lay Pastoral Leadership Roles, (Cardinal John Dew, Archdiocese of Wellington, New Zealand)
  • Lessons from South Africa, The Parish as a Community of Communities (Bishop Michael Wüstenberg, Bishop Emeritus, Aliwal, South Africa)
  • Lessons from Liverpool,  The Experience of Widnes as a Witness to Team Ministry (Rev. Matthew Nunes Episcopal Vicar for Formation, Archdiocese of Liverpool)
  • Lessons from Canada,  Rites and Responsibilities: The Role of the Clergy and the Laity in the Catholic Church, (Dr Margaret Lavin, Professor Emeritus at Regis College, Toronto)
  • Applying the Learnings, Facilitated by Martin Kennedy and Dr Jessie Rogers.

You can visit the website of the Irish Institute for Pastoral Studies HERE.

Register for the conference 28th and 29th August HERE which also includes the full schedule and back ground information on each of the presenters and facilitators.

You can listen to Fr Eamonn's interview excerpted from the main programme podcast HERE.

Gospel - John 6:1-15


John 6:1-15, 24-35 by Kathleen Rushton
Source
Jesus went across the Sea of Galilee. A large crowd followed him,because they saw the signs he was performing on the sick. 
Jesus went up on the mountain,and there he sat down with his disciples. The Jewish feast of Passover was near. When Jesus raised his eyes and saw that a large crowd was coming to him,he said to Philip,"Where can we buy enough food for them to eat?" He said this to test him,because he himself knew what he was going to do. Philip answered him,"Two hundred days' wages worth of food would not be enough for each of them to have a little."  
One of his disciples,Andrew, the brother of Simon Peter, said to him,"There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish;but what good are these for so many?" Jesus said, "Have the people recline." Now there was a great deal of grass in that place. So the men reclined, about five thousand in number.  
Then Jesus took the loaves, gave thanks,and distributed them to those who were reclining,and also as much of the fish as they wanted. When they had had their fill, he said to his disciples,"Gather the fragments left over,so that nothing will be wasted."  
So they collected them,and filled twelve wicker baskets with fragments from the five barley loaves that had been more than they could eat. When the people saw the sign he had done, they said,"This is truly the Prophet, the one who is to come into the world."  
Since Jesus knew that they were going to come and carry him off to make him king, he withdrew again to the mountain alone.
Reflections on this weeks gospel:

Word on Fire
English Dominicans
Centre for Liturgy

Liturgical odds & ends

Liturgy of the Hours - psalter week 1

Saints of the week

July 30th - St Peter Chrysologus
July 31st - St Ignatius Loyola
August 1st - St Alphonsus Liguoiri
August 2nd - Our Lady of the Angels also the Indulgence of St Mary of the Portiuncula
August 3rd - St Senarch of Clonard (First Friday)
August 4th - St John Vianney (First Saturday)

Pope's Intentions 
The Treasure of Families
That any far-reaching decisions of economists and politicians may protect the family as one of the treasures of humanity.